Once Upon a time … Exclusive Tribal Art Auction (Private Sale David Norden)

Once upon a time, a long time ago, there was a shop in Antwerp where time stood still. Once you walked in the door, your eyes would be dazzled by hundreds of ancient gods, of masks, of curiosities from Africa and all over the world, looking down from the shelves. It was like walking into a different world, a different time…like a Victorian cabinet of curiosities still alive and well in this busy world. 

…and the wonderful thing is…it’s still there… and if in Antwerp you can even go and find the shop yourself and lose yourself among the shelves, and benefit from all thirty years of his experience collecting, owning and selling some of the world’s most beautiful and refined tribal and non-western art. 

Right now there is a mask or a figure standing on a shelf in Antwerp that has been waiting for you all its life. So come and see them. They’re waiting for a new home, or place a bid on those available online.

David Norden African Art. Sint Katelijnevest 27. B2000 Antwerpen. Belgium. Phone: +32 3 227 35 40 OR email: david.norden@telenet.be

Lots in auction (ending Sunday December 1, 2019 at +/- 8 p.m. Belgian time)

Mask – Wood – Provenance Marceau Riviere – Baule – Côte d’Ivoire

Mask - Wood - Provenance Marceau Riviere - Baule - Côte d'Ivoire

Reserve price: €1500

Mask – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Ituri – Congo DRC

Mask - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Ituri - Congo DRC

Reserve price: €780

Mask – Wood – Prov – Yaka – Congo DRC

Mask - Wood - Prov  - Yaka - Congo DRC

Reserve price : €300

Mask – Wood – Published Prov Schaedler – Boki – Cross River, Nigeria

Current bid: €900

Mask - Wood - Published Prov Schaedler - Boki - Cross River, Nigeria

Reserve price: €1500

Poro Mask – Porcelain, Wood – Provenance Gaethan Schoonbroodt – Dan Gere – Liberia

Poro Mask - Porcelain, Wood - Provenance Gaethan Schoonbroodt - Dan Gere - Liberia

Reserve price: €650

Mask – Wood – Prov Carlo Bold – Suku – Congo DRC

Mask - Wood - Prov Carlo Bold - Suku - Congo DRC

Reserve price : €753

Sculpture – Wood – Prov Mark Verstockt – Mumuye – Mali

Sculpture - Wood - Prov Mark Verstockt - Mumuye - Mali

Reserve price: €450

Sculpture – Wood – Prov Donald Taitt – Mumuye – Mali

Sculpture - Wood - Prov Donald Taitt - Mumuye - Mali

Reserve price: €393

Sculpture – Wood – Prov Gaetan Schoonbroodt – Mumuye – Mali

Sculpture - Wood - Prov Gaetan Schoonbroodt  - Mumuye - Mali

Reserve price : €855

Ancestor figure – Wood – Jo Nyeleni- Prov Jan Kusters – Bamana – Mali

Ancestor figure - Wood - Jo Nyeleni- Prov Jan Kusters - Bamana - Mali

Reserve price: €958

Bird Mask – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Baoulé – Ivory Coast

Bird Mask - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Baoulé - Ivory Coast

Reserve price : €350

Shrine (figure) – Feathers, Plant fibre, Wood – Provenance Jan Van Camp – Lobi – Liberia

Shrine (figure) - Feathers, Plant fibre, Wood - Provenance Jan Van Camp - Lobi - Liberia

Reserve price : €275

Shrine figure – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Mambila – Nigeria

Shrine figure - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Mambila - Nigeria

Reserve price : €350

Small Shrine figure – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Mambila – Nigeria

Small Shrine figure - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Mambila - Nigeria

Reserve price: €350

Doll – Wood, horse hair – Provenance Donald Taitt – Lobi – Burkina Faso

Doll - Wood, horse hair - Provenance Donald Taitt - Lobi - Burkina Faso

Reserve price : €150

Mask – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Bamileke – Cameroon

Mask - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Bamileke - Cameroon

Reserve price : €470

Doll – Wood – Akuaba-Provenance Donald Taitt – Ashanti – Ghana

Doll - Wood - Akuaba-Provenance Donald Taitt - Ashanti - Ghana

Reserve price : €200

Maternity figure – Wood – Provenance Bob Germ – Dogon – Mali

Current bid: €1

Maternity figure - Wood - Provenance Bob Germ - Dogon - Mali

Reserve price not met: €250

Mask – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Dan Gere – Liberia

Mask - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Dan Gere - Liberia

Reserve price : €400

Head – Wood – Provenance Robert van der Heijden – Lobi – Burkina Faso

Head - Wood - Provenance Robert van der Heijden - Lobi - Burkina Faso

Reserve price: €635

Mask – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – lega – Congo DRC

Mask - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - lega - Congo DRC

Reserve price : €300

Ancestor figure – Wood – Nkishi – Bakongo – Congo DRC

Ancestor figure - Wood - Nkishi - Bakongo - Congo DRC

Reserve price : €250

Figure – Dense Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Lobi – Burkina Faso

Figure - Dense Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Lobi - Burkina Faso

Reserve price : €485

Cubistic Ancestor Figure – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Mumuye – Nigeria

Cubistic Ancestor Figure - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Mumuye - Nigeria

Reserve price : €400

Sculpture – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Boa – Congo DRC

Sculpture - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Boa - Congo DRC

Reserve price : €350

Female Figure – Wood – Bateba Thilkotina- Provenance Donald Taitt – Lobi – Burkina Faso

Female Figure - Wood - Bateba Thilkotina- Provenance Donald Taitt - Lobi - Burkina Faso

Reserve price : €300

Figure – Wood – Provenance Donald Taitt – Lobi – Ghana

Figure - Wood - Provenance Donald Taitt - Lobi - Ghana

Reserve price : €200

Ancestor figure – Brass, Wood – Nkishi – Songye – Congo DRC

Ancestor figure - Brass, Wood - Nkishi - Songye - Congo DRC

Reserve price : €1550

Fish figure – Wood – Kumawu – Baoulé – Ghana

Fish figure - Wood - Kumawu - Baoulé - Ghana

Reserve price : €300

Living African Art Treasures

60X Living African Art Treasures By David Norden

Dear  Friends,

The auction catalogue is ready on LiveAuctioneers :

https://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/149497_living-african-art-treasures-by-david-norden/

The live auction will take place on September 22nd, 2019 at 08:00 PM BELGIAN TIME or 11:00 AM Pacific Time.

Find below images and links to my 60 very finest pieces; all lots will start at half my low estimates.Click the blue links to read the whole descriptions.

Ibo female figure NigeriaProv: Taitt collection

0001:  Ibo female figure NigeriaProv: Taitt collection

Est. €1,500-€2,500

Female Luba African

0002:  Female Luba African

Est. €900-€1,200

An early Luba figure

Prov: Patric Claes collection

0003:  An early Luba figure Prov: Patric Claes collection

Est. €1,100-€2,000

Baule tribe wood Mudfish

0004:  Baule tribe wood Mudfish

Est. €600-€1,200

Senufo top of a cultivator staff

0005:  Senufo top of a cultivator staff

Est. €700-€1,400

Mumuye Figure

0006:  Mumuye Figure

Est. €1,500-€2,500

A small Mumuye Figure

Prov: Taitt collection

0007:  A small Mumuye Figure Prov: Taitt collection

Est. €1,800-€2,500

A Mumuye Figure Prov:Mark Verstockt collection

0008:  A Mumuye Figure Prov:Mark Verstockt collection

Est. €1,200-€1,800

Urhobo figure- Nigeria Prov: René David collection

0009:  Urhobo figure- Nigeria Prov: René David collection

Est. €800-€1,500

Urhobo EDJO RE AKARE figure Nigeria XIXth century

0010:  Urhobo EDJO RE AKARE figure Nigeria XIXth century

Est. €8,000-€10,000

Dogon maternityProvenance: Bob Germ

0011:  Dogon maternityProvenance: Bob Germ

Est. €500-€1,000

A XIXth century Hemba Kusu figure 

Prov: Kahan Gallery

0012:  A XIXth century Hemba Kusu figure Prov: Kahan Gallery

Est. €8,000-€15,000

Bamana Jo Nyeleni figure

Prov: Jan Kusters collection

0013:  Bamana Jo Nyeleni figure Prov: Jan Kusters collection

Est. €3,000-€5,000

Suku mask with animal on top

0014:  Suku mask with animal on top

Est. €3,000-€5,000

Suku maskProv: Gaëtan Schoonbroodt collection

0015:  Suku maskProv: Gaëtan Schoonbroodt collection

Est. €1,500-€2,500

A Luba Chieftain diviners

0016:  A Luba Chieftain diviners

Est. €1,000-€1,500

Yaka mask

0017:  Yaka mask

Est. €2,000-€3,500

Kuba Bwoom mask

0018:  Kuba Bwoom mask

Est. €1,000-€3,000

Pende Stool 4 heads

Prov: Desaive collection

0019:  Pende Stool 4 heads Prov: Desaive collection

Est. €2,000-€3,000

Small Mangbetu stool for women Prov: Gaëtan

0020:  Small Mangbetu stool for women Prov: Gaëtan

Est. €800-€1,600

Ngombe African Stool

Prov: Alphadjo Zagamor

0021:  Ngombe African Stool Prov: Alphadjo Zagamor

Est. €700-€1,500

Hemba Figure in the style of the master of Buli

0022:  Hemba Figure in the style of the master of Buli

Est. €5,000-€8,000

Songye African Art Figure

0023:  Songye African Art Figure

Est. €2,400-€4,800

Kwele Style Head Gabon 

Prov: Frédéric Coppin

0024:  Kwele Style Head Gabon Prov: Frédéric Coppin

Est. €3,000-€4,000

Lengola-Ituri figure

0025:  Lengola-Ituri figure

Est. €1,000-€2,000

Bamana iron

0026:  Bamana iron

Est. €800-€1,200

A Chamba Figure

0027:  A Chamba Figure

Est. €1,500-€2,500

Chokwe Stool with Seated Figure

Prov: Donald Taitt

0028:  Chokwe Stool with Seated Figure Prov: Donald Taitt

Est. €1,500-€2,000

Baule female

0029:  Baule female

Est. €1,500-€2,000

Two Kafigeledio Senufo

0030:  Two Kafigeledio Senufo

Est. €2,600-€3,500

Bamileke Bull mask

0031:  Bamileke Bull mask

Est. €3,000-€4,000

Marka Ntomo mask

Prov: Philip Budrose collection

0032:  Marka Ntomo mask Prov: Philip Budrose collection

Est. €2,000-€4,000

"aringo ogun Yoruba staff.  Prov: Gaetan Schoonbroodt"

0033:  “aringo ogun Yoruba staff. Prov: Gaetan Schoonbroodt”

Est. €600-€1,200

Old Madagascar peddler figure

0034:  Old Madagascar peddler figure

Est. €1,400-€3,000

Oily Songye BelandeProv: Patric Claes collection

0035:  Oily Songye Belande Prov: Patric Claes collection

Est. €4,000-€6,000

Bamileke Flute Player figure

Prov: Gaetan Schoonbroodt

0036:  Bamileke Flute Player figure Prov: Gaetan Schoonbroodt

Est. €1,500-€2,500

Fon Voodoo figure

0037:  Fon Voodoo figure

Est. €1,000-€1,500

0038:  Southern Tanzania Masasi maskEst. €3,000-€4,000

0039:  Large Songye Hermaphrodite Figure Prov: Van …

Est. €3,000-€4,000

A fine Igala Mask

Prov: René David Collection

0040:  A fine Igala Mask Prov: René David Collection

Est. €3,000-€4,000

Bacongo horse-hair fly whisk

0041:  Bacongo horse-hair fly whisk

Est. €1,000-€2,000

A Sowei Bundu mask from the Sande society

0042:  A Sowei Bundu mask from the Sande society

Est. €1,800-€3,000

Maternity Senufo

0043:  Maternity Senufo

Est. €6,000-€12,000

Fine Guro mask

Prov: Alphadjo Zagamor collection

0044:  Fine Guro mask Prov: Alphadjo Zagamor collection

Est. €2,500-€3,500

Boki MaskProv: Schaedler

0045:  Boki Mask Prov: Schaedler
Est. €4,000-€6,000

Ibo figure- Prov: Berg-en-Dal museum

0046:  Ibo figure- Prov: Berg-en-Dal museum

Est. €2,000-€3,000

Dark Ibo mask with three miniatures on top

0047:  Dark Ibo mask with three miniatures on top

Est. €2,200-€3,500

Dan maternity Bronze by artist Ldamie of Gaple

0048:  Dan maternity Bronze by artist Ldamie of Gaple

Est. €6,000-€8,000

Ashanti goldweight

0049:  Ashanti goldweightEst. €800-€1,500

Ashanti goldweight man holding some wood and two pots

0050:  Ashanti goldweight man holding some wood and two pots

Est. €600-€1,200

Nepal Spring FigureProv: Jan Kusters

0051:  Nepal Spring FigureProv: Jan Kusters

Est. €800-€1,500

0052:  Iatmul over-modelled skull
Est. €2,000-€4,000

Mounted Pende Lizard House PanelProv: Jo De Buck

0053:  Mounted Pende Lizard House Panel Prov: Jo De Buck
Est. €3,000-€5,000

0054:  Abelam House Post Papua New Guinea

Est. €3,500-€5,000

House panel Papua New GuineaProv: Gaetan Schoonbroodt

0055:  House panel Papua New GuineaProv: Gaetan Schoonbroodt

Est. €1,000-€2,000

NOTE: My limit prices for all lots will start at half my low estimates.

Feel free to browse and pinpoint the lots you are most interested in; register for the auction today to place a bid or participate in the live bidding. It is also possible to place autobids on Liveauctioneers.

https://www.liveauctioneers.com/catalog/149497_living-african-art-treasures-by-david-norden/

Painted Washkuk Hills ceiling

0056:  Painted Washkuk Hills ceiling

Est. €1,000-€2,000

Vanuatu Ambryn Islands Graded Society Fern Figure

0057:  Vanuatu Ambryn Islands Graded Society Fern Figure

Est. €1,500-€3,500

Massim spirit figure

Prov: Gaetan Schoonbroodt

0058:  Massim spirit figure Prov: Gaetan Schoonbroodt

Est. €1,000-€2,000

A Kundu drum –Asmat PNG

Prov: Donald Taitt collection

0059:  A Kundu drum –Asmat PNG Prov: Donald Taitt collection

Est. €1,200-€1,500

0060:  Mompa Mask, Bhutan South Tibet.

Est. €3,000-€6,000

Happy reading, and happy bidding!

David

P.S.: The winners of each auction lot will get the package delivered free of charge worldwide with the printed book included. This is less of an auction catalogue than a deluxe, hardback book, which will look very much at home on a coffee table!

http://online.fliphtml5.com/jqqr/bkqt/

If you or your friends interested in African Art want to stay informed and receive my auction alerts visit:

More News To Follow. Share if you like with your friends.

David Norden African Antiques.

Sint Katelijnevest 27
B2000 Antwerpen.
Belgium
+32 3 227.35.40
david.norden@telenet.be

Webversion link:
[webversion]

Unsubscribe link:
[unsubscribe]

Afrikaanse Kunst Database

“De eigenaars van de grootste zwarte kunstdatabank ter wereld: “Als iemand iets weggooit en jij neemt dat mee: is dat dan roofkunst?”

13 April 2019 door Tekst: Kristof Bohez / Foto: Geert Van de Velde

Artikel bron: https://www.nieuwsblad.be/cnt/dmf20190411_04315599

De eigenaars van de grootste zwarte kunstdatabank ter wereld: “Als iemand iets weggooit en jij neemt dat mee: is dat dan roofkunst?”
Foto: Geert Van de Velde

In een sober kantoortje in een buitenwijk van Brussel lopen jaarlijks 10.000 mails over ­Afrikaanse voorwerpen binnen. Vragen van ­handelaars, galeristen, musea of verzamelaars. Zelfs iemand met een beeldje op zolder kan een beroep doen op vader en zoon Van Rijn, ­beheerders van de grootste fotobib met ­Afrikaanse kunst. Guy (65) en Titus (27) weten waar dat masker aan uw muur vandaan komt, en willen na jaren stilte eindelijk hun stem ­laten ­horen tussen de roepers in het ­roofkunstdebat.

“In Parijs vond iemand een beeldje bij een vuilnisbak. Dat bleek vijf miljoen waard te zijn”Guy van Rijn

Eind vorig jaar kondigde ex-president Kabila aan dat Congo tegen de zomer een oproep voor restitutie – het teruggeven van geroofde kunst – zou richten aan België. En de Franse president Emmanuel Macron probeerde politiek te scoren door tientallen werken te beloven aan oud-kolonie Benin. Het bracht een verhit ­debat op gang. Alles teruggeven aan Congo!, klonk het ook bij Belgen na de heropening van het Belgische AfricaMuseum.

Als ze zoiets horen, zuchten ze ten huize Van Rijn. Heus niet alles wat uit de koloniën komt, is roofkunst, vinden vader Guy en zoon Titus van de African Heritage Documentation & Research Centre. Guy startte als ­jongeman met een fotoverzameling van Afrikaanse kunst, vandaag ­beheert zijn zoon Titus mee ’s werelds grootste fotocollectie, met liefst 165.000 ­files.

Guy van Rijn: “Toen ik rond m’n 17de naar Parijs ging en er m’n eerste foto’s maakte van objecten, dachten de handelaars: Die vader is bij z’n verstand, maar die zoon spoort niet. Je moet weten dat m’n vader en moeder destijds een galerie met etnische kunst runden in Amsterdam. Vader had me gevraagd om mee te werken in de zaak. Dat aankopen van spullen vond ik gezellig, maar dat verkopen was niks voor mij. Dus ging ik me ­specialiseren in documentatie.”

“Op een dag schoof zo’n Franse ­handelaar een stuk naar me toe. Weet je wat dit is?, vroeg-ie. Ja, en ik weet ook dat twee dezelfde exemplaren ­terug te vinden zijn in musea in Philadelphia en Boston. Vanaf die dag werd ik serieus genomen, omdat ze in mij iemand zagen die geld kon ­opbrengen.”

De eigenaars van de grootste zwarte kunstdatabank ter wereld: “Als iemand iets weggooit en jij neemt dat mee: is dat dan roofkunst?”
Foto: Geert Van de Velde

Hoe bepalen jullie de waarde van een ­kunstvoorwerp uit Afrika?

Guy: “Dat laten we aan de markt over, wij zijn geen handelaars. Wij ­onderzoeken herkomst, gebruik en context. Authentiek betekent voor ons: in het land van herkomst ­gemaakt, en daar ook gebruikt. Niet vergeten dat veel van de voorwerpen die vandaag als kunst beschouwd worden, oorspronkelijk gebruiks­voorwerpen waren.”

Titus: “Namaak komen we ­jammer genoeg ook tegen, voorwerpen die in water gedrenkt zijn om ze ouder te laten lijken. Dan moeten er koolstoftesten uitgevoerd worden om de ­werkelijke leeftijd vast te stellen.”

Wanneer is iets roofkunst?

Guy: “Hier denken mensen dikwijls dat álle objecten die uit Afrika komen, gestolen zijn. Terwijl Afrikaanse stamhoofden vroeger bijvoorbeeld vaak exemplaren van een stuk lieten bijmaken om, bewust van de ­commerciële waarde die zulke ­replica’s hadden, de kolonisator ­tevreden te stemmen.”

“In sommige regio’s gooiden Afrikanen ook maskers weg na een ritueel, of dreigden er dingen verbrand te worden. Is dat dan roofkunst, als ­Europeanen die zaken ­meenamen?”

Volgens Congolees ex-president ­Mobutu wel. Die riep tijdens zijn ­bewind in de ­vorige eeuw al op tot totale restitutie: ­alle Afrikaanse ­cultuurobjecten ­teruggeven aan het moederland.

Guy: “Mobutu was ook de man die bij bezoek van politieke gasten aan Kinshasa zomaar iets uit een museumkast haalde en het weggaf. Waardoor die dingen ­later circuleerden als koopwaar in Brussel. In eigen land deed hij ook eens zo’n oproep tot restitutie. Resultaat: zo’n duizend beelden die opdoken. Mensen hielden massaal dingen verborgen omdat ze bang waren om het kwijt te raken aan het regime.”

“Natúúrlijk is er in Afrika geroofd tijdens de koloniale periode. De eerste duidelijk kunstroof dateert van 1897. Britse troepen stalen toen meer dan 4.000 bronzen en ivoren objecten uit Benin City (vandaag Zuid-Nigeria, nvdr.). Die koningsvoorwerpen, de meeste zeker 100.000 euro waard, ­belandden zo ook in musea in en ­buiten Engeland.”

Titus: “In 2007 is men beginnen te praten over uitwisseling met Nigeria, iets wat er binnenkort van moet ­komen. Onder kenners – zowel in Afrika als in het Westen – is er ­consensus dat je dat het best op het ­niveau van instellingen kan aan­pakken, niet op dat van de politiek.”

De eigenaars van de grootste zwarte kunstdatabank ter wereld: “Als iemand iets weggooit en jij neemt dat mee: is dat dan roofkunst?”
Foto: Geert Van de Velde

Guy: “Sommige politici en media zijn zo Trump-achtig geworden. Er is geroofd. Maar van alle Afrikaanse voorwerpen die circuleren, is roofkunst een kleine minderheid.”

Volgens sommige bronnen bevindt 80 à 90 procent van al het Afrikaanse erfgoed zich buiten Afrika. Dat is héél veel.

Titus: “Die percentages zijn uit de context gerukt. Wat met Afrikaanse kunst die recentelijk gemaakt werd? Of oude rituele Afrikaanse dansen die nooit buiten het continent geraakt zijn, is dat geen erfgoed? We moeten ‘Afrikaans erfgoed’ niet ­definiëren door een westerse bril.”

Guy: “Niks op tegen om nog meer erfgoed in Afrikaanse musea te krijgen. Maar ik zeg altijd: Als je een vliegtuig laat opstijgen, moet er elders wel een plek om te landen zijn. Een museum moet goed uitgerust zijn om stukken te bewaren, te onder­houden, te verzekeren… Dat is niet overal zo.”

Neksteuntje

Het rijhuis van de familie Van Rijn, sinds 18 jaar in Brussel, heeft wat van een museum. In de woonkamer staan voorwerpen van mensen die hun ­aankoop laten onderzoeken, en eigen objecten waarvan er af en toe eentje verkocht wordt om de werking ­rendabel te houden. Giften laten de vzw ook leven.

Zijn er ook veel goudzoekers in jullie branche?

Guy: “Het is nu eenmaal een sector waar veel geld in omgaat. Vorig jaar is een neksteuntje geveild voor 1,2 miljoen euro. In Parijs vond iemand een beeldje bij een vuilnisbak dat vijf miljoen waard bleek. Onze vzw had dat geld ook graag gehad.” (lacht)

Hoe luidt het advies als iemand een geroofd voorwerp in huis blijkt te hebben?

Guy: “We waarschuwen de eigenaar, want het gaat zoals met vals geld: geef het uit en het komt toch ­terug bij jou. Roofkunst is iets waar je vooral níét mee bezig moet zijn. Vaak is de praktijk natuurlijk complexer dan de theorie, en blijkt iemand te goeder trouw zo’n stuk van een handelaar te hebben gekocht. Of, zoals we meemaakten, blijkt iemand iets te hebben gekocht dat ontvreemd werd uit een museum. Uit een belangrijk Europees museum. Ik maakte een ­afspraak met die museumdirecteur. Ik heb een hypothese, zei ik. Stél dat ik weet waar een masker zit dat bij jullie gestolen werd, en de eigenaar te bang is om het via de politie te regelen. Het antwoord luidde: Daar hebben we geen oplossing voor. (kijkt boven zijn bril uit)Andere hypothese, antwoordde ik. Stel dat u koffie gaat halen, en bij terugkeer het masker op uw bureau vindt? Tja, dan zou het weer ­opgenomen worden in de collectie. Ga nou maar koffie halen, zei ik, waarna ik dat masker ging halen. Veel beter toch dan dat de eigenaar dat stuk uit angst vernietigd zou hebben? Dat is het allerergste. Mensen, verniel alstublieft geen voorwerpen of ­beschrijvingen. Zo kunnen we dat prachtige erfgoed niet beschermen.”

Tijd voor een portretfoto. Guy poseert bij een versierde steunbalk van een oude Malinese woning. Op vraag van de fotograaf gaat Guy zitten in een praalstoel uit West-Afrika. Titus flankeert. Twee witte mannen over zwarte kunst. Dat dit roepers uit hun kot kan lokken, denken we hardop.

Titus: “Ik begrijp het als Belgen van mijn leeftijd met Congolese roots ­ervoor pleiten om alle kunst terug te sturen. Ze zijn trots op het land waar hun voorouders vandaan komen, zo’n oproep past in een bredere bewustwording. Alleen is het zo simpel niet. Als je beslist om dingen terug te ­geven, aan wie geef je ze dan? Aan de etnische groep waar het vandaan komt? Aan de familie van de hout­snijder? Degene die destijds een ­commissie kreeg om het te ver­handelen? Een emotioneel argument is in dit debat niet het beste.”

Als beleidsmedewerker bij Broederlijk Delen en Pax Christi staat Nadia Nsayi met één been in Congo. Zij zegt dat jongeren er vooral werk en een beter leven willen, veeleer dan oude kunst in een museum.

Guy: (knikt) “Arme mensen zijn niet begaan met kunst. Ook rijke Afrikanen zijn vandaag maar bij uitzondering geïnteresseerd in etnische kunst. Moderne Afrikaanse kunst of moderne westerse kunst zoals een Picasso, dát is wat ze meestal willen.”

“In New York had de directeur van de afdeling Afrikaanse kunst van een grote galerie enkele Afro-Amerikaanse artiesten uitgenodigd om over Afrikaanse kunst te praten, natuurlijk ook in de hoop dat die rijke jongens iets zouden kopen. Jay-Z en Snoop Dogg zaten mee aan tafel. Alles ging goed, tot één van die kerels plots vroeg wat men nou eigenlijk verwachtte. ­Afrikaanse kunst kopen? Denk je dat ik Afrikaan ben, misschien? Het was duidelijk: die oude kunst ­interesseerde hen helemaal niet.”

Hoe zien jullie de toekomst van oude ­Afrikaanse kunst?

Guy: “De meest ideale situatie is dat kunst gaat roteren in ­musea over ­continentale grenzen heen. De ­Afrikaanse landen die daar klaar voor zijn, kunnen meedoen. Een ­uitwisseling door musea, dus, in plaats van eenrichtingsverkeer ­richting land van herkomst.”

Titus: “Verspreiding is bovendien een garantie op overleven. Alles ­centraliseren kan gevaarlijk zijn, denk aan brand- of waterschade.”

Guy: “Ik hoop alleszins dat het debat rond de teruggave aan nuance wint. Het is niet zwart of wit. Er is héél veel grijs. Kunst die niet enkel in het land van herkomst zit, is van alle tijden. Niet alle werken van Rubens hangen in Antwerpen. Zo kan het ook met Afrikaanse kunst in Europa gaan.”

De eigenaars van de grootste zwarte kunstdatabank ter wereld: “Als iemand iets weggooit en jij neemt dat mee: is dat dan roofkunst?”
Foto: Geert Van de Velde

De vzw African Heritage Documentation & Research ­Centre wil graag uw oude kunstvoorwerpen fotograferen en documenteren. Contact via titusvanrijn@ahdrc.eu of david.norden@telenet.be die doorgeeft.

Drie keer heel kostbaar

Drie keer heel kostbaar
Foto R.R.

Uit de 165.000 stukken die het ­African Heritage Documentation & Research Centre documenteert, kiezen Guy en Titus van Rijn er drie met een verhaal.

1. Beeld (92 cm hoog) uit de Senufo-traditie in West-Afrika (een inspiratiebron voor Picasso) wordt ­beschouwd als een van de meest iconische oude ­Afrikaanse kunstwerken. Volgens de Senufo was de vrouw goddelijk. Het beeld werd in 2014 bij Sotheby’s in New York verkocht voor 12 miljoen dollar of 10 miljoen euro, daarmee het duurste stuk verkocht op een openbare veiling.

2. Houten masker gemaakt door de Songye, die ­eeuwen geleden oprukten vanuit het zuiden van huidig Congo. Een masker had meerdere functies, zoals boze geesten afschrikken of autoriteit uitstralen. ­Vermoedelijk was dit masker voor een vrouw, omdat er geen hoge kam op het hoofd staat. In Belgisch privébezit.

3. Relikwiebeeld uit het ­Gabon van voor 1920. Dankzij samenwerkende onderzoekers is de naam van de meester niet langer onbekend: ene Semangoy maakte meerdere ­varianten, met ook andere symbolen dan een mond in de hoofding. Elk beeldje is minstens 100.000 euro waard. Ook dit stuk is ­onderdeel van een Belgische privéverzameling.

Nkisi Kondi de L’AfricaMuseum

” Cette Statue Est Volée, Pourquoi est-elle alors encore à Tervueren?”

En couverture du De Morgen, un titre “sensationaliste” concernant la restititution d’une piece phare eo.0.0.7943 de L’AfricaMuseum, m’a donné envie de creuser un peu plus l’objet en question, sa provenance, et son histoire .

Alexandre Delcommune
Notre voyage au Congo en 1920

Alexandre Delcommune en 1876
La Statu Nkisi Kondi de l’AfricaMuseum qui a été récolté par le Lieutenant Delcommune près de Boma le lendemain d’une expédition ou il avait brûlé le village qui refusait de se rendre aux ordres de Leopold II

Dans son livre Vingt années de vie africaine récits de voyages, d’aventures et d’exploration au Congo Belge, 1874-1893 ( Publié en 1922, Larcier Bruxelles ) Alexandre Delcommune

Dans un article ‘Decolonisation and colonial collections: An unresolved conflict’ Maarten Couttenier, ( 2018. EO.0.0.7943. BMGN – Low Countries Historical Review, 133(2), pp.91–104. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18352/bmgn-lchr.10553 ) explique que la statue a déjà été reclamée a mainte reprises, la première fois dans les années 1870-1880, ensuite dans les années 1960-70’s par Mobutu Sese Seko dans le cadre du recours à l’authenticité et la dernière fois en 2016 après que Maarten Couttenier ( qui travaille pour le MRAC, maintenant AfricaMuseum) ai contacté l’un des 9 chefs coutumiers de Boma qui demandent la restitution des objets collectés par Alexandre Delcommune en 1878 expliquant que la statue parle encore toujours et qu’en cas de restitution la statue kitumba peut parler et rendre les pouvoir au chef et le protéger. Ces nombreuses demandes de restitution sont restées sans réponse officielle, et le curateur de l’AfricaMuseum Mr. Volper est opposé aux restitutions.

Dans le livre posthume de 1922 “Vingt années de vie africaine. 1874-1893; récits de voyages d’aventures et d’exploration au Congo Belge” Alexandre Delcommune explique a partir de la page 50 ses “aventures” avec les rois de Boma fin 1878, après la famine qui fut a l’origine des conflits avec entre autre le Roi Jouca-Pava qui décida un jour de l’attaquer au petit matin, mais Delcommune fut prévenu, et était bien décidé a ne pas se laisser tuer

Un peu plus loin le fetiche est detruit par le tir, et Delcomunne gagne la bataille. Je n’ai pas retrouvé mention du village brûlé et du fétiche .

Les Femmes Indigènes de Bokatulak

En lire plus:

https://archive.org/details/vingtannesdev01delc/page/52

By examining one ‘ethnographic’ object kept at the Royal Museum for Central Africa, this article discusses three consecutive demands for restitution of the Nkisi Kondi eo.0.0.7943, in 1878, in the 1960s-1970s, and in 2016. Neither informal nor official demands resulted in the actual return of the object to Congo. Instead, it featured in major exhibitions in Belgium, the Netherlands and the United States. While the Tervuren museum ‘donated’ other objects to local Congolese museums in the 1970s and 1980s, Congolese voices by now seem powerless, and debate is almost inexistent in Belgium. So what can museums and communities do? I argue that both provenance research and local expertise can provide rich and useful contemporary insights on objects and people, as well as on acquisition and exhibition history. Such objects and insights may be integrated in exhibitions Europe and Africa, with all its uplifting and darker consequences. What is more valuable: owning an object or the encounter.

https://www.bmgn-lchr.nl/articles/10.18352/bmgn-lchr.10553/#fg001

Weergaloos, betoverend en brutaal geroofd

Teruggeven of niet: Congolees topstuk legt tweespalt binnen AfricaMuseum bloot

Na een jarenlange renovatie en heroriëntering ging het AfricaMuseum in Tervuren eind vorig jaar weer open. BELGA/BELPRESS
Na een jarenlange renovatie en heroriëntering ging het AfricaMuseum in Tervuren eind vorig jaar weer open. BELGA/BELPRESS

Weergaloze kunst, de expo waarmee het AfricaMuseum opnieuw de deuren opende, toont trots het spijkerbeeld Nkisi nkonde. Onderzoek toont glashelder aan dat alvast dit ene stuk brutaal geroofd werd. Tot driemaal toe werd het beeld teruggevraagd vanuit Congo. Vooralsnog zonder resultaat.

Door KARLIEN BECKERS ( De Morgen 9 Maart 2019)

Het spijkerbeeld Nkisi nkonde werd in 1878 meegenomen nadat een dorp door Belgen in brand was gestoken. PLUSJ, RMCA TERVUREN
Het spijkerbeeld Nkisi nkonde werd in 1878 meegenomen nadat een dorp door Belgen in brand was gestoken. PLUSJ, RMCA TERVUREN

‘Betoverende objecten uit het Koninklijk Museum voor Midden-Afrika.’ Zo luidt de ondertitel van Weergaloze kunst, de tijdelijke tentoonstelling die de heropening van het vernieuwde AfricaMuseum in Tervuren kracht moet bijzetten. De selectie wordt beschreven als ‘de artistieke wereldtop’. Daartussen: Nkisi nkonde, het spijkerbeeld dat je recht in de ogen staart wanneer je de ruimte binnenloopt. Dikke strengen touw hullen het beeld in een soort vreemde mantel.

Gecatalogiseerd onder ‘eo.0.0.7943’ legt het bijbehorend pamflet je uit dat aan de geest die in het beeld zou wonen magische krachten werden toegeschreven. Je kon iets wensen van het beeld, een nganga (priester) zou er dan een spijker in slaan. Als die bleef zitten, werd je verzoek ingewilligd.

Het beeld is onderwerp van een paper die Maarten Couttenier, historicus aan het AfricaMuseum, afgelopen zomer publiceerde. Gespecialiseerd in koloniale geschiedenis en de geschiedenis van musea, onderzocht hij de herkomst van het beeld.

Wat hij ontdekte, klinkt weinig fraai. Zo beschrijft Couttenier hoe Alexandre Delcommune, officier bij het koloniaal leger van Leopold II, in 1878 de dorpen rond Boma aanvalt, de latere hoofdstad van Leopolds speeltuin Kongo-Vrijstaat. In zijn memoires beschrijft Delcommune zelf hoe hij de dorpen om drie uur ‘s ochtends in brand steekt, en het beeld in de struiken vindt nadat de dorpelingen zijn weggevlucht. Niet lang na de aanval bieden plaatselijke stamhoofden de Belg geld aan om Nkisi nkonde terug te krijgen. Delcommune weigert. Sudderend conflict

In 1912 wordt het beeld als schenking opgenomen in de collectie van het museum. Wanneer het van 1967 tot 1969 als deel van een rondtrekkende tentoonstelling door de VS reist, inspireert dit de Zaïrese president Mobutu tot een vernieuwde vraag om het beeld terug te geven in een toespraak bij de VN (1973). In 2016 reist Couttenier voor zijn eigen studie naar de regio. Wanneer hij de lokale bevolking een foto van het beeld laat zien, wordt opnieuw gevraagd om Nkisi nkonde terug te geven.

Bij de heropening, in december vorig jaar, claimde directeur Guido Gryseels dat het museum voortaan een hedendaagse, kritische blik zou werpen op de koloniale geschiedenis. Dat het museum in zijn eerste expo trots blijft uitpakken met een beeld waarvan een eigen werknemer glashelder aantoont dat het geroofd is, is op zijn minst bizar. De kwestie met het spijkerbeeld legt een sudderend conflict bloot achter de museumschermen. Aan de ene kant staan de ‘vernieuwers’, die menen dat in Tervuren lang niet ver genoeg gegaan wordt. Anderzijds blijven er ook meer behoudsgezinde krachten, die elk debat over excuses en teruggave afblokken.

Opmerkelijk is alleszins dat Coutteniers onderzoek bij de huidige tentoonstelling niet vermeld wordt. Zowel de digitale brochure als het naamplaatje focust op het belang en de functie van het beeld. Stamhoofd Ne Kuko, de oorspronkelijke eigenaar van het beeld, wordt beschreven als “iemand waar Delcommune een conflict mee had”. De ‘inbeslagname’ werd door de plaatselijke leiders als “een gijzeling beschouwd”. Er wordt niet verder uitgeweid over de werkwijze van Delcommune, laat staan over de herhaalde vraag om het beeld terug te geven. Waarom niet?

“Ik vermeld Coutteniers’ onderzoek niet om verschillende redenen”, zegt Julien Volper, conservator in de afdeling Culturele Antropologie & Geschiedenis. Hij cureert de expo waar het beeld zich nu in bevindt. “Ten eerste zit er nooit een bibliografie bij. Ten tweede heb ik dit object ook zelf onderzocht, en daar verwijs ik ook niet naar. Ten derde is dit een tijdelijke tentoonstelling, met een bepaalde keuze, en zijn eigen thematiek. Ik vind dat de bezoeker niet enkel recht heeft op informatie over hoe het in de collectie is gekomen.” Volper wijst erop dat er in andere delen wel al de nadruk ligt op een dekoloniserende context. “Er zijn volgens mij meer genuanceerde manieren om aan dekolonisatie te doen.”

Moet het beeld terug? Ook Maarten Couttenier meent in zijn paper dat het antwoord lastiger is dan de vraag. Hij haalt de geopolitieke belangen, de emoties rond het debat en de praktische vragen aan, zoals waar de voorwerpen terechtkomen, hoe die bewaard zullen worden en het legale kader. Couttenier wil niet ingaan op verdere vragen over restitutie.

Curator Volper wil van teruggave niet weten. “Een samenleving is gebouwd rond rechtspraak”, zegt hij. “De Unesco-conventie over restitutie dateert uit 1970 en is niet retroactief. Beide landen hebben het verdrag geratificeerd. In die zin is er dus geen rechtmatige vraag voor restitutie mogelijk. De Tuin der lusten van Jheronimus Bosch hangt in het Prado in Spanje. Gaan we dat ook terugvragen?

“Of we het willen of niet, Congo was Belgisch. Die voorwerpen maken ondertussen deel uit van de Belgische geschiedenis. Teruggeven, in naam van wie, in naam van wat? Deze objecten zijn eigendom van de Belgische staat.” Nazisme

In Nederland hebben juist nu drie grote historische musea, waaronder het Tropenmuseum, beloofd dat ze koloniale roofkunst willen teruggeven. In België zijn we nog lang zo ver niet, blijkens de stellingname van bevoegde stemmen, zoals die van Julien Volper.

Volper mag gerust een hardliner in dit debat genoemd worden. Twee jaar geleden schreef hij er al een brief over aan de Franse krant Le Figaro met als veelzeggende titel “Laten we onze musea verdedigen”. In zijn tekst noemt hij mensen die voor restitutie pleiten “vijanden van de musea, die deze willen transformeren in tombes, ontdaan van hun schatten”. Zo argumenteert hij even verder dat ook de Joden niet alles terugkregen wat hen voor en tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog onder het nazisme is ontnomen.

Er zijn ook andere stemmen, ook in of rond het AfricaMuseum. Vlak voor de heropening van het museum ondertekenden 36 Afrika-specialisten een open brief aan voormalig staatssecretaris voor Wetenschapsbeleid, Zuhal Demir (N-VA). Ze vragen dat er afstand wordt gedaan van eigendommen die in Belgische handen zijn terechtgekomen door diefstal of plundering.

“Alles hangt af van wat je verstaat onder diefstal”, reageert Volper. Bovendien is hij ervan overtuigd dat slechts een klein aandeel van de collectie werkelijk met geweld is verkregen. Het grootste deel is gekocht of geruild. “Het museum in Tervuren bestaat al meer dan 100 jaar. Dat is een serieuze tijdspanne om een collectie uit te bouwen. Het klopt dat die objecten destijds minder geld kostten. Dat sommigen nu enorm in waarde zijn gestegen, is een gevolg van de markt.” Over een exact percentage van geruilde versus gestolen voorwerpen in de collectie kan hij zich niet uitspreken.

Van een teruggave van het spijkerbeeld kan volgens Volper geen sprake zijn. “Zelfs als dit stuk met militair geweld in onze collectie is gekomen. Het maakt nu deel uit van de geschiedenis van het beeld. We kunnen onmogelijk retroactief de misdaden uit het verleden gaan veroordelen met actuele wetgeving. Als dat het geval is, moeten we dan vragen dat de nakomelingen van bepaalde Congolese chefs die deelnamen aan de slavenhandel voor het tribunaal in Den Haag verschijnen voor de misdaden tegen de mensheid van hun voorvaderen? En als je met één stuk begint, komt er geen einde aan.” Ook wijst hij erop dat het dankzij de conservatie in Tervuren is, dat deze voorwerpen er überhaupt nog zijn. 114 werken teruggestuurd

In het debat rond restitutie wordt vaak geargumenteerd dat er geen geschikte musea zijn om de werken naar terug te sturen. Momenteel wordt er in Congo een nieuw nationaal museum gebouwd met financiering van Zuid-Korea. En in Rwanda viert het Nationale Museum dit jaar zijn dertigste verjaardag. Zou de aanwezigheid van adequate musea niets aan de Belgische houding moeten veranderen?

Tot nu toe werd er vooral gesproken over het digitaal ter beschikking stellen van de collectie. Ook door museumdirecteur Guido Gryseels. Volper sluit zich hierbij aan. “Als Congolese musea een uitbreiding van hun collectie wensen, dan ben ik absoluut bereid hen daarin te adviseren. Maar de artefacten zullen ze naar mijn mening moeten aankopen. Er is een aanbod op de kunstmarkt. Onder Mobutu zijn er overigens 114 werken op lange termijn uitgeleend aan Congo door het AfricaMuseum, daar blijven er vandaag nog 21 van over. Worden die dan ook gerecupereerd?”

Het AfricaMuseum heeft vooralsnog geen officieel standpunt ingenomen over een mogelijke teruggave. Operationeel directeur Bruno Verbergt, die namens het museum het woord voert over deze kwestie, erkent wel dat de geschiedenis van het spijkerbeeld beter gekaderd had moeten worden. “De teksten zijn door de mazen van het net geglipt”, zegt Verbergt, die bevestigt dat de teksten in alle andere tentoonstellingsruimten zijn nagekeken door externen.

Meerdere van deze experts, die het museum moesten adviseren over de diaspora, ondertekenden mee de open brief aan toenmalig staatssecretaris voor Wetenschapsbeleid Zuhal Demir (N-VA). Anne Wetsi Mpoma is een van hen. De samenwerking met het museum eindigde in mineur, vertelt ze. “Op het moment dat we erbij werden gehaald, waren de grote beslissingen al genomen. Toen de samenwerking moeizaam verliep, werden er gewoon geen vergaderingen meer georganiseerd. Ik kreeg van afzonderlijke departementen soms teksten toegestuurd, waar ik dan correcties in aanbracht. Om dezelfde tekst vervolgens nog eens toegestuurd te krijgen, zonder dat er rekening werd gehouden met mijn opmerkingen. Er was geen enkele verplichting om rekening te houden met ons advies, en als de ene afdeling het advies volgde, dan keurde de andere afdeling die weer af”.

Het kabinet van Minister voor Wetenschapsbeleid Sophie Wilmès (MR) reageert: “De minister weet dat er gesprekken zijn tussen de verantwoordelijken van het Nationaal Museum van Congo, de Universiteit van Kinshasa en het AfricaMuseum.” Ze zegt de dialoog aan te moedigen.

———-Praktisch———–

The AfricaMuseum previously The Royal Museum for Central Africa or RMCA, colloquially known as the Africa Museum, is an ethnography and natural history museum situated in Tervuren in Flemish Brabant, Belgium, just outside Brussels. It was first built to showcase King Leopold II’s Congo Free State in the 1897 World Exhibition.

Address: Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren Belgium

Director:Guido Gryseels (2001–) Founded: 1898

https://www.africamuseum.be/

Op Pagina 2 : België en Europa worstelen met koloniale roofkunst

Le Butin De Storms doit-il être restitué ?

On peut se poser la question si le la tête trophée et les objets volé a lépoque par Storms doivent être rapatriés au peuple Tabwa.
Le retour de Lusinga Iwa Ng’ombe

Dans une boîte qui se trouve à l’Institut Royal des Sciences naturelles de Belgique repose le crâne de Lusinga lwa Ng’ombe. Le 4 décembre 1884, ce puissant chef tabwa qui vivait dans la région du lac Tanganyika fut décapité lors d’une expédition punitive commanditée par Emile Storms. Ce militaire belge, autrefois décoré, aujourd’hui oublié, dirigeait la 4ème expédition de l’Association Internationale Africaine. Il faisait tuer les chefs rebelles et il se constituait une collection de crânes pour impressionner ses ennemis. A la fin de son séjour en en Afrique, Storms ramena le crâne de Lusinga mais aussi ceux de deux autres chefs locaux (Mpampa et Marilou). Alors qu’ils sont toujours conservés en Belgique, ces restes humains invitent à un travail de mémoire sur des crimes qui ont été commis au nom de la « civilisation » dans les premiers temps de la colonisation. Ils questionnent aussi notre présent. Peut-on se contenter d’une muette solution de « stockage » dans un musée ? La Belgique ne doit-elle tout mettre en œuvre pour rendre possible le retour de ces restes humains en Afrique? Le « butin » de Storms fut aussi constitué de plusieurs statuettes qui font partie des “trésors” du Musée Royal de l’Afrique centrale à Tervuren…

Le gouvernement belge favorable à une restitution du crâne de Lusinga!

Un article publié par Michel Bouffioux sur le site Paris Match.be, le 30 mars 2018

Trouvé sur :https://parismatch.be/actualites/132376/exclusif-crane-de-lusinga-le-gouvernement-belge-favorable-a-une-restitution-des-restes-humains

Zuhal Demir, la Secrétaire d’Etat à la Politique scientifique du gouvernement belge, se dit favorable à une évolution législative permettant la restitution aux familles congolaises apparentée…

Zuhal Demir (N-VA), la Secrétaire d’Etat à la Politique scientifique du gouvernement belge, se dit favorable à une évolution législative permettant la restitution aux familles congolaises apparentées des crânes qui ont été « collectés » par un militaire belge pendant les premiers temps de la colonisation.

Entre 1882 et 1885, le militaire belge Emile Storms commandait la 4ème expédition de l’Association Internationale Africaine dans la région du lac Tanganyika. Lorsque des chefs locaux refusaient de se soumettre à son autorité, ils étaient l’objet d’expédition punitives. Certains d’entre eux ont été décapités et leurs villages ont été incendiés et pillés. Storms faisait collection des crânes de ses ennemis. Il en ramena trois en Belgique. L’enquête publiée le 22 mars 2018 par Paris Match Belgique retraçait le parcours de ces restes humains et particulièrement de ceux appartenant à Lusinga lwa Ng’ombe, un puissant chef Tabwa qui eut la tête tranchée le 4 décembre 1884 alors que ses villages étaient réduits en cendre, que plusieurs dizaines d’habitants étaient assassinés par des mercenaires, que plus d’une centaine d’autres personnes étaient capturées sans que l’on sache ce qu’elles devinrent et que des femmes étaient victimes de viols collectifs…

En 2018, le crâne de Lusinga, ramené en Belgique par le commanditaire de ces crimes, se trouve conservé dans une boîte à l’abri des regards, au sein de l’Institut Royal des Sciences naturelles de Belgique (IRSNB) à Bruxelles. Il en va de même pour un deuxième crâne, celui d’un autre chef insoumis qui s’appelait Marilou. Le troisième crâne de la « collection Storms », celui d’un prince appelé Mpampa, a disparu.

Dans le cadre de l’enquête de Paris Match Belgique, la directrice de l’IRSNB, Camille Pisani s’était déjà déclarée favorable à une restitution de ces restes humains en cas de demande d’une famille congolaise apparentée. Toutefois ces crânes sont légalement la « propriété » de l’État belge dont le patrimoine est inaliénable. Le chemin d’une éventuelle restitution, une première en Belgique, passe par l’adoption de dispositions législatives spécifiques.
« Ces crânes ne sont pas des objets de musée »

Nous avons cherché à connaître la position du gouvernement belge sur ce débat à forte teneur éthique et symbolique. C’est la secrétaire d’État à la politique scientifique, Zuhal Demir (N-VA) qui est compétente dans ce dossier car elle assure la tutelle des Établissements scientifiques fédéraux dont l’IRSNB fait partie. Après avoir lu notre enquête, la secrétaire d’État nous a fait savoir qu’elle était « très choquée » par les faits d’une extrême violence qui ont conduit, in fine, à l’aboutissement de ces restes humains dans un musée en Belgique. « Nous ne sommes pas responsables de ce qui s’est passé il y a plus de cent ans, mais nous le sommes de ce que nous faisons de ces restes humains aujourd’hui », nous dit-elle, via sa porte-parole. Elle ajoute : « Clairement, ces crânes ne sont pas des objets de musée. Ce sont des restes de personnes humaines identifiées. Nous leur devons le respect. Dès lors, si une famille congolaise apparentée devait les réclamer, je serais favorable à une évolution du cadre légal afin de permettre leur restitution. » La secrétaire d’État estime enfin que si une telle restitution devait avoir lieu, elle devrait se faire dans le cadre d’une « cérémonie officielle » afin que la Belgique contemporaine témoigne d’une « attitude respectueuse » à l’endroit des familles concernées et qu’elle prenne clairement ses distances par rapport aux faits qui ont été commis.

Des descendants de Lusinga ou de Marilou se manifesteront-ils ? L’avenir nous le dira…